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For more than 30 years Cultural Survival has been the most trusted and comprehensive source of information on indigenous issues in the world. And all of that information, thousands of pages and hundreds of articles, is available on this website.  Simply enter a search term in the box at the top of this page and begin your journey.

 

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This past October, the Port Gamble S’klallam Tribe was one of four other tribes to receive the Honoring Nations award for excellence in the governance, effectiveness, and sustainability for their Child Welfare Program. Awarded by the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe was one of six finalists to receive the award. To continue their line of firsts, the Port Gamble S’klallam Tribe has also recently become the first tribe to qualify for the Title IV-E waiver, which will allow them more flexibility in how “family” is defined and financial allocation.

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The legalization of community radio stations has been an on-going struggle for Indigenous communities in Guatemala for almost 20 years. Community radio stations operate in the fear of being raided by the Guatemalan Public Ministry because the current telecommunications law does not allow for non-profit community radio—despite its guarantee in the 1996 Peace Accords, the Guatemalan Constitution, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

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Latest CSQ Articles

No Longer Business as Usual: The Financial Case for Respecting Indigenous Rights

The cost of doing “business as usual” with Indigenous Peoples has a new spin in a recent report published by First Peoples Worldwide. The Indigenous Rights Risk Report: How Violating Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Increases Industry Risks finds that US extractive companies expose shareholders to tangible risks by neglecting the rights of the nation’s Indigenous Peoples.

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Down to Our DNA: Voice and Power in the Music of Frank Waln

One hundred miles southeast of Badlands National Park in South Dakota, on a plot of roughly 1,400 square miles, lays the Rosebud Indian Reservation. Home to 20,000 Sicangu (“Burnt Thigh”) Lakota people, the plot was first established in 1889 as part of the broader Great Sioux (Lakota) Settlement. Some mornings on the Reservation, when the fog is slow to burn off, it nestles in the rolling South Dakota hills and shrouds the land in silence.

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